ICOST 2005 : 3rd International Conference On Smart homes and health Telematic

From Smart Homes to Smart Care - July 4-6, 2005

Keynotes

  • Supporting Tasks in a Programmable Smart Home,
    by Dr Roy H. Campbell,
    Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Professor in Computer Science,
    Siebel Center for Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • Ubiquitous Computing to Support Older Adults and Informal Caregivers,
    by Dr Jay Lundell,
    Proactive Health Laboratory, Intel.
  • Human-friendly Man-Machine Interaction in Smart Home,
    by Dr Z. Zenn Bien,
    Director of the Human- friendly Welfare Robotic System Research Center.
    Korean Advance Institue of Science and Technology.
    (no paper included in the proceedings)
Keynotes
Human-friendly Man-Machine Interaction in Smart Home,
by Dr Z. Zenn Bien,
Director of the Human- friendly Welfare Robotic System Research Center.
Korean Advance Institue of Science and Technology.
(no paper included in the proceedings)
About Prof Zenn Bien

Biography: Z. Zenn Bien received his B.S. degree in electronics engineering from Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, in 1969 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, U.S.A., in 1972 and 1975, respectively. During 1976-1977 academic year, he taught as assistant professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Iowa. Then Dr. Bien joined Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Summer, 1977, and is now Professor of Department of electrical Engineering & Computer Science and Technology, KAIST. He was a visiting faculty at the University of Iowa during his 1981-1982 sabbatical year and a visiting researcher at CASE Center of Syracuse University, New York, and visiting professor at Depít of Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology during 1987-1988 academic year.
Prof. Bien has been serving for the professional societies, domestic and oversea, in numerous manner. He was the founding president of the Korea Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems Society during 1990-1995 and also, the general chairs for IFSA World Congress 1993, and for FUZZ-IEEE99, respectively.† Dr. Bien also served as the President of IEEk, for the year 2001. Being a vice president for IFSA (International Fuzzy Systems Association) during 1997-2001, he is now serving as the president of IFSA. He is also the chairman of Engineering Division of Korea Academy of Science and Technology and the president of Korea Robotics Society. At KAIST, Prof. Bien served as Dean of Academic Affairs and later Dean of College of Engineering and has been the Director of Human-friendly Welfare Robot System Engineering Research Center since 1999. He is an editorial advisory board member for International Journal of Fuzzy Systems (IJFS) and for Journal of Intelligent & Fuzzy Systems, an editorial board member for IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems, an associate editor for Fuzzy Optimization and Decision Making(FODM). Prof. Bien is currently an Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Fuzzy Systems and International Journal of Human-friendly Welfare Robotic Systems.

Research Interests: His current research interests include Intelligent Control Theory and Methodologies with, particular attention to† Fuzzy Logic-based Control, and Service Robotics, and Rehabilitation Systems and Industrial Automation. Prof. Bien has published more than 337 international journal/proceedings papers, and has authored/coauthored 5 technical books. He has obtained 9 patents registered and 12 pending.

 
Supporting Tasks in a Programmable Smart Home,
by Dr Roy H. Campbell,
Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Professor in Computer Science,
Siebel Center for Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
About Roy H. Campbell

Research Interests: Security, distributed operating systems and ubiquitous computing.

Research Statement: Professor Campbell's research interests are the problems, engineering and construction techniques of complex system software. Security, continuous media, and real-time control and pose a challenge to operating system designers. Ubiquitous, distributed and parallel systems require complex resource management and efficient implementations. Object-oriented design aids organizing software, supports customization and offer new approaches to building dynamic distributed systems and middleware. As the Internet grows, the importance of interoperability, security and reliability increase. Over time, research in system software has become increasingly important and the construction of complex system software a focus for advanced software engineering techniques.
His current research projects include active spaces for ubiquitous computing, authorization for sensor networks, simulations of network security, and the design of peer-to-peer distributed operating systems.

More infos on this page.

 
Ubiquitous Computing to Support Older Adults and Informal Caregivers,
by Dr Jay Lundell,
Proactive Health Laboratory, Intel.
About Jay Lundell

Biography: Jay received his doctorate in cognitive psychology in 1988 from the University of Washington. There he studied decision making, expert knowledge, and computational theories of cognition. He worked at Hewlett Packard as a human factors engineer and later managed a human factors group working on system administration tools for Unix workstations. He then moved into graphical end-user interfaces, and worked on a cross-company graphical desktop for Unix with HP, IBM, and Sun. Jay joined Intel in 1995, and has conducted usability research, developed requirements, and designed user interaction models for a number of consumer products, such as the Intel Web Tablet, the Intel museum web site ArtMuseum.net, as well as working with outside companies such as Ticketmaster and the Home Shopping Network to develop consumer-friendly Internet commerce sites.

Research Interests: Jay's interests are in research methodologies to support use models and requirements for technology products. He has used a variety of techniques on a wide assortment of users, from participatory design with children, to co-discovery techniques with teens, to conjoint analysis with on-line ticket purchasers. He has conducted longitudinal studies of in-home technology prototypes, studies of the emotional impact of different web site designs, multi-dimensional scaling of user interface attributes, and many other approaches, all in an effort to provide insight into the requirements of technology applications. He is currently working in the area of aging, using ethnographic approaches to understand how technology might be used to help elders live independently and with a high quality of life in their homes.